Why am I still missing some GeoIP data?

Recently I wrote about an issue I encountered where a client’s website was missing its GeoIP data (and the related back-end analytics data) entirely. While the changes discussed in that post solved the problem of there being no MongoDB data for GeoIP lookups at all, I continued to see odd issues with many users not being located after those fixes were made. Sorting this out seems to suggest that some of the “common wisdom” about configuring GeoIP for analytics isn’t right – so here are my latest findings: Continue reading

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Playing MythBusters with Sitecore setup suggestions

Recently a colleague of mine told me about a suggestion they’d been given about setting up an instance of Sitecore. They were told that you should put your license file into a subfolder of your data directory because the license check enumerates files and folders in the directory containing the file. So if the folder contained other things, this would slow down the check. This sounded odd to me as you have to specify the exact path of the license in your config, so I thought I’d do some investigating, and see if I could prove or disprove the suggestion.

So, putting on my best beret at a jaunty “for science!” angle, here’s what I discovered: Continue reading

Why am I missing my GeoIP data?

Updated: There is a follow-up to this post, which points out some extra issues with the way GeoIP configuration is currently documented for v8-era Sitecore setups that change the “Analytics.PerformLookup” setting below. If this setting is of interested to you, please read that too!


I spent some time this week looking at a client site whose analytics data was missing GeoIP information. Since they had a valid license for Sitecore’s GeoIP lookup service, this was a bit confusing. So, continuing my battle to write up all the unexpected scenarios… Continue reading

An interesting side effect of compiled views

I read a blog post earlier this week that talked about the benefits of compiling your View files to increase performance in Sitecore applications. Reading that post (which I stupidly failed to keep track of the link to, so can’t reference it now the comments pointed me back to) reminded me of an interesting issue that came up on a project I was looking at recently. If you’re interested in the raw performance of your Sitecore sites, you might want to consider this as well when you’re planning your views: Continue reading

Could there be performance pain in your future?

A few weeks back I wrote about spotting site performance challenges in the patterns you might see in trace data. But over the years I’ve noticed another set of repeating patterns that can be relevant here: Those of how a development team can find itself thinking and acting in the run up to a project hitting problems.

If any of these resonate with you and your team, maybe it’s time to take a step back and think about how you can improve things? Continue reading

Shooting yourself in the foot with a config patch – redux

Sitecore’s config patch files are great. But sadly it’s entirely possible to cause yourself headaches with them. I’ve written before about how it’s possible that small typos can cause big issues. In that style, a colleage brought an issue to me recently which was an interesting new variation on this fun… Continue reading

Spotting common challenges when you’re doing performance tracing

I find myself doing quite a lot of work on performance for Sitecore websites at the moment. Whenever I do a similar job for a group of clients, I start to spot patterns in the sites I’m working on – and it struck me that there are some common performance issues that can be spotted just from the overview graphs you see when you collect trace data.

So to try and help you all improve the sites you ship, here are three that I’ve come across in a few projects recently: Continue reading